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Welcome to our online searchable database of the Journal of Perioperative Practice (JPP) articles (1998 - present).

JPP is the official journal of the AfPP. It promotes perioperative practice through publishing literature reviews, research-based articles, topical discussions, advice on clinical issues, current news items and product information. The journal also encourages a sense of community among perioperative practitioners by providing a forum for debate.  Members and non-members can use our search facility. You can search by the article's title, a subject keyword or by author.

Should you wish to download the full article, members will be asked to enter their surname and membership number if they are not already logged in. Non-members will be asked for a payment of £10 to download the full article. All articles are Acrobat PDF format and full instructions are given on how to download and save the file.

GET MORE FOR LESS.  If you are buying an article, then for £1.50 LESS (i.e. £8.75) you could have paid your first month's AfPP membership entitling you to access the entire archive of over 1,000 articles for free.  If you download articles regularly or are likely to, buying membership might be a better option for you.

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Corneal abrasion following anaesthesia for non-ocular surgical procedures: A case-controlled study (PDF 414 Kb)

Published- Nov 2017. Author - AL Carniciu, MJ Fazzari, P Tabibian, P Batta, RC Gentile, JH Grendell, CE Brathwaite and N Barzideh.

The aim of this study was to identify risk factors associated with perioperative corneal abrasion (CA) at a single hospital in Mineola, New York (USA). A chart review was conducted of patients with perioperative CA following non-ocular surgery and age-matched controls between June 2011 and November 2013. Gender, diabetes status, surgical procedure or position were not found to be associated with the occurrence of a CA. Corneal abrasions were associated with longer procedures and history of pre-existing ocular disease. No significant association between body positioning or surgical site and perioperative CA was found. The study concludes that a longer duration of surgical procedure and pre-existing ocular disease are risk factors for perioperative CA.

£ 10.00 (free to members)

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How do I look (PDF 310 Kb)

Published- Nov 2017. Author - K McCutcheon.

Editorial November 2017.

£ 0.00 (free to members)

Corneal abrasion following anaesthesia for non-ocular surgical procedures: A case-controlled study (PDF 414 Kb)

Published- Nov 2017. Author - AL Carniciu, MJ Fazzari, P Tabibian, P Batta, RC Gentile, JH Grendell, CE Brathwaite and N Barzideh.

The aim: to identify risk factors associated with perioperative corneal abrasion (CA) at a single hospital in Mineola, NY (United States). A chart review was conducted of patients with perioperative CA following non-ocular surgery and age-matched controls between Jun 2011 and Nov 2013. Gender, diabetes status, surgical procedure/position were not found to be associated with the occurrence of a CA. Corneal abrasions were associated with longer procedures and history of pre-existing ocular disease. No significant association between body positioning or surgical site and perioperative CA was found. The study concludes: a longer duration of surgical procedure and pre-existing ocular disease are risk factors for perioperative corneal abrasion.

£ 10.00 (free to members)

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Could you collect the next patient please...? (PDF 373 Kb)

Published- Nov 2017. Author - A Jones.

President's message November 2017.

£ 0.00 (free to members)

eAppendicitis: Diagnostic uncertainty in appendicitis and the role of ehealth – does IT help? (PDF 336 Kb)

Published- Nov 2017. Author - J Batt, J Kynaston and J Olivier.

The availability of medical information on the World Wide Web as grown as information technology has become more accessible. Patients seeking online information may be able to self-select conditions having been adequately informed. This study evaluates the effect of eHealth information on those presenting to hospital with a suspected appendicitis and its effect on their management and clinical outcome. Patients who had performed online reading were more likely to go to theatre but were less likely to have a confirmed histological diagnosis of appendicitis.

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