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1 in 8 have Experienced Personal Medical Information Theft

Released on - 12/05/2017

1 in 8 have Experienced Personal Medical Information Theft

One in eight consumers in England have had their personal medical information stolen from technology systems, according to results in a new survey from Accenture.

On average, 77% had to pay approximately £172 in out-of-pocket costs per incident.

The BBH reported that of those, breaches are most likely to occur in pharmacies, followed by hospitals, urgent care clinics, physician’s offices and retail clinics.

The probe of 1,000 consumers in England revealed that the vast majority – 78% - believe healthcare providers have a great deal of responsibility for keeping digital healthcare data secure, compared to only 40% who believe it is their personal responsibility.

Despite this, the findings show that more than half – 56% - of those who experienced a breach were victims of medical identity theft; and more than three-quarters of those victims - 77% - had to pay approximately £172 in out-of-pocket costs per incident, on average.

In addition, the survey found that the breaches in England were most likely to occur in pharmacies — the location cited by more than one-third – 35% - of consumers who experienced a breach — followed by hospitals (29%), urgent care clinics (21%), physician’s offices (19%) and retail clinics (14%).

More than a third (36%) of English consumers who experienced a breach found out about it themselves, or learned about it passively through noting an error on their health records or credit card statement.

Only one fifth (20%) were alerted to the breach by the organisation where it occurred, and even fewer consumers – 14% - were alerted by a government agency.

Among those who experienced a breach, the majority (70%) were victims of medical information theft, with more than a third (39%) having personal information stolen.

Unlike credit card identity theft, where the card provider generally has a legal responsibility for significant account holder losses; victims of medical identity theft often have no automatic right to recover their losses.

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